Il Passaggio Segreto

The duo Il passaggio segreto is dedicated to presenting Italian and English baroque works played by arclute, theorbo and soprano. Their intimate duo setting provides an ideal atmosphere for story telling in music, with their programs woven together to suggest and invoke an invitation to imagine the narrative, lives and tales beneath the score.


Il Passaggio Segreto, consists of soprano Camille Hesketh, and lutenist Guzmán Ramos and was formed in 2010 in the Hague, Netherlands. Since this time, they have been developing repertoire and performing several recitals in The Netherlands and Spain of English and Italian baroque music.  Recent performances include a music theatre presentation with Les Autres Muziektheater and Kosmopolis (NL), and a recital in the Vredepaleis, NL.

                                                                                                           www.ilpassaggio.com

 

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Program 01:  'Tis my fate to be thy slave

 

Program 02:  Amor è qual vento

AMOR E QUAL VENTO

The works included on this program from Italian composers spanning from 1567- 1687 have been ordered outside of their original context to tell a story of one person's journey which is similar to many; a search for harmony, happiness and peace however possible. Amor è qual vento begins as one person's path, content in the quiet of the night and in reverence of its beauty, soon enters into various tales of intimate romance and heartbreak through their search. We then follow our protagonist through flirtation, joy, lust, obsession, treachery and loss.  With reference to nature, the harmony of the spheres, or by a higher religious power, they continue to seek happiness while getting trapped in the perils of love in all of its forms. At the end of this short program, we find our protagonist quenching her thirst by a stream in the idyllic aria from F. Cavalli's opera La Calisto. There, the nymph Calisto, sings of being free and alone in nature amongst the springs and woods. Cavalli may have been slightly tongue in cheek when setting this aria, considering the lustful tragicomic relationships between the humans and gods in the opera's plot, but here, if only for a moment, Calisto suggests that to live in liberty without the trappings of lust and romance, that is what is truly sweet.

 

Claudio Monteverdi was one of the most important composers of his time. He marked the transition between the polyphonic and madrigalist traditions of the 16th century, and the birth of 17th  century opera. He composed most of his works in Venice, where he gained one of the most respected musical positions of Italy; the choir maestro and conductor of the San Marco Cathedral.  Among the singers of the San Marco choir, he met the young future composer Francesco Cavalli, with whom Monteverdi maintained a close relationship throughout his life.

F. Cavalli, who first began as a singer, an organist, then a composer, wrote numerous high quality sacred works, but it was his oeuvre of more than thirty operas which made him famous throughout Europe. With the exception of his short visit to the court of Louis XIV in France, his artistic life was spent almost entirely in Venice.  It was in Venice where Claudio Saracini, composer and lutenist, published his books of madrigals. Despite the fact that we do not have evidence that he was working professionally as a musician, his compositions were admired by even Monteverdi himself.

Another lutenist on this program, Girolamo Kapsberger, was born in Venice, and moved to Rome at a young age where he developed his career as a musician and composer. He was known as il tedesco della tiorba (the german of the theorbo), due to his German origins, and composed some of the most important works for lute and theorbo of his time, as well as many motets and madrigals. In Rome, he most likely knew Bellerofonte Castaldi, virtuoso of the theorbo, who took refuge in Rome after a violent incident in his birth city of Modena. Castaldi composed works for theorbo as well as numerous madrigals.

'TIS MY FATE TO BE THY SLAVE

The works included on this program from Italian composers spanning from 1567- 1687 have been ordered outside of their original context to tell a story of one person's journey which is similar to many; a search for harmony, happiness and peace however possible. Amor è qual vento begins as one person's path, content in the quiet of the night and in reverence of its beauty, soon enters into various tales of intimate romance and heartbreak through their search. We then follow our protagonist through flirtation, joy, lust, obsession, treachery and loss.  With reference to nature, the harmony of the spheres, or by a higher religious power, they continue to seek happiness while getting trapped in the perils of love in all of its forms. At the end of this short program, we find our protagonist quenching her thirst by a stream in the idyllic aria from F. Cavalli's opera La Calisto. There, the nymph Calisto, sings of being free and alone in nature amongst the springs and woods. Cavalli may have been slightly tongue in cheek when setting this aria, considering the lustful tragicomic relationships between the humans and gods in the opera's plot, but here, if only for a moment, Calisto suggests that to live in liberty without the trappings of lust and romance, that is what is truly sweet.

 

Claudio Monteverdi was one of the most important composers of his time. He marked the transition between the polyphonic and madrigalist traditions of the 16th century, and the birth of 17th  century opera. He composed most of his works in Venice, where he gained one of the most respected musical positions of Italy; the choir maestro and conductor of the San Marco Cathedral.  Among the singers of the San Marco choir, he met the young future composer Francesco Cavalli, with whom Monteverdi maintained a close relationship throughout his life.

F. Cavalli, who first began as a singer, an organist, then a composer, wrote numerous high quality sacred works, but it was his oeuvre of more than thirty operas which made him famous throughout Europe. With the exception of his short visit to the court of Louis XIV in France, his artistic life was spent almost entirely in Venice.  It was in Venice where Claudio Saracini, composer and lutenist, published his books of madrigals. Despite the fact that we do not have evidence that he was working professionally as a musician, his compositions were admired by even Monteverdi himself.

Another lutenist on this program, Girolamo Kapsberger, was born in Venice, and moved to Rome at a young age where he developed his career as a musician and composer. He was known as il tedesco della tiorba (the german of the theorbo), due to his German origins, and composed some of the most important works for lute and theorbo of his time, as well as many motets and madrigals. In Rome, he most likely knew Bellerofonte Castaldi, virtuoso of the theorbo, who took refuge in Rome after a violent incident in his birth city of Modena. Castaldi composed works for theorbo as well as numerous madrigals.